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1


Dave is the 3rd son of the late comedian, and Past King Rat, George Jackley, and younger brother of the late Nat Jackley

He started his career as a member of the Eight Lancashire Lads and has spent most of his working life in the theatre, both performing and on the production side, working for the Bernard Delfont Organisation and Robert Nesbitt during 11 pantomime seasons at the London Palladium in the 50's and 60's. This led to him being involved with many Royal Command Performances.

Fully experienced in all aspects of theatre life, Dave also starred in a TV series, "The Handy Gang", in 1963 - the same year that his wife Marie was Queen Ratling. Marie and Dave met when in Pantomine together in Birmingham. Marie was a Tiller Girl. After Marie passed away in 1966 Dave married Doris and spent many summer seasons in Blackpool as Company Manager at The Opera House, The Winter Gardens and the North Pier Theatre. He retired at the age of 70 in 1983

Biographical note provided in December 2000 by his daughter, Josephine. 
JACKLEY-HIRSCH, David (I0098)
 
2

 
MUNRO, Kenneth MacLeod (I0028)
 
3

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2004/jul/10/guardianobituaries1


Street named after Mari in Madrid is

Av. de Mari Pepa Colomer, 28905 Getafe, Madrid, Spain

Full Spanish name Mari Pepa Colomer i Luque

Video of Inauguraci? Pla?a Josep M? Carreras i Dexeus - Reus, 05-06-2014 at

URL https://vimeo.com/97904068

This memorial to her husband Josep (Jep)

Attended by her twin children Richard and Montse

**Googling will flag many references in Spanish Press to her life** 
COLOMER, Mari Pepa (I1255)
 
4

Subj: Re: Family
Date: 17/07/01 17:18:52 GMT Daylight Time
From: saoirsem@hotmail.com (Saoirse McClory)
To: IMunro1977@aol.com



Dear Ian,

My, how wonderful that you'll be seeing your cousin again after all these
years - what a fascinating trip you have ahead of you. Thank you for your
invitation to join you for dinner while you're in NY - as it turns out I am
planning to visit my sister, Bianca (daughter of my mother, Bobo Sigrist and
her first husband) in California that week and so won't be able to make it.

As for my father, I just received an email from him, a portion of which I'll
paste in below. He would like you to resend your emails as he didn't
receive your earlier contact. His email address is olav8@aol.com.

Kevin writes:

Quote

Your Doran E-mail. certainly interested me. Timothy Doran
(born in Wexford was a very remarkable and productive man) after leaving
Australia, married and helped his wife produce 12 children; 6 boys 6 girls.
His eldest son George Doran was tall elegant man... a well know actor who
emigrated to United States -eventually being gunned down and killed in New
York! (have no reason why). He had changed his name to stage name George
Sydenham-(not an unusual trait in our family) many like Punty -Bronte
another my father Thomas John McClory to Desmond O'Donovan, My brother
Desmond McClory to Desmond O'Donovan for many years, now back to Desmond
McClory. I an currently booked into the hotel in Dublin as Kevin
O'Donovan......confused?

MamaJo as I was taught to call her was small, elegant but very imposing in a
theatrical way; she did not want the stage mentioned after marrying The
Owner of the Theatre she was playing in London. (She had divorced my
Grandfather George after he lost his leg in the door of a tram in San
Fransisco (wouldnt you know!) and found work difficult being confined to
parts like 'Moby Dick' or Long John Silver with his 'peg leg'. When my
mother showed signs of wishing to go on the stage, she was packed off ti
Ypres in Belgium where she was incarcerated in a convent, which later being bombed out moved lock stock barrels and nuns to Connemara where you were later to be incarcerated. Now,
maybe I am wrong but I have always believed that Mamajo's real name was Jeannette - posssibly Josephine Shellf . (German or Austria). I believe I gave you a copy of my mother's unpublished
auto-biography you should find the information your correspondent is looking for in there...incidently my mother defied Mamajo, went on the London Stage
and subsequently met my father in a play "Paddy is the next best
thing...... then in quick succession produced Voila, Desmond and Kevin."

Unquote

Hope this helps.

Best wishes to you,

Saoirse




 
MCCLORY, Kevin O'Donovan (I0342)
 
5
Bankruptcy Petition 18 Oct 1934 published in London Gazette("LG") on 9 Nov 1934

Receiving Order published in LG on 9 Nov 1934

Hearing 15 March 1935 published in LG on 19 February 1935

Discharge Suspended to 15 Mar 1937: published in LG on 12 April 1935 - "guilty of misconduct". Believed to refer to speculating on Stock Exchange under aliases, together with cousin Donald Henry Munro (1912-88).

Notice of Intended Dividend published in LG on 17 July 1936

Notice of Dividend Payable (5/8th of 1 Old Penny that is 0.26 of 1 New Penny published in LG on 1 September 1936

Date of Release : 18 Nov 1936 published in LG on 1 Dec 1936

Notice of Intended Dividend published in LG on 9 April 1937

Notice of Supplemental Dividend published in LG on 8 June 1937

Address given in all Notices was 65 Biddulph Mansions Maida Vale London W9, but after January 1936 was living with Mother and Sister in Banstead Surrey

Discharged from Bankrutcy 1938

***********************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Briefly served in Auxiliary Fire Service (AFS) during London Blitz, then joined RAF December 1940.




*****************************************************************************************************************************************************

Equipment Officers' Course at EO School 11 January 1941 to 8 March 1941. Passed "A" 73%.

Known to have served at RAF Grange over Sands Lancs. Service Record received August 2001 indistinct, but final posting was to Uxbridge 16 April 1946. Date of Release from Active Service 15 November 1946. Rank on release: Squadron Leader. Relinquished commission 10 February 1954 under the terms of the Navy, Army and Air Force Reserves Act 1954.

*************************************************************************************************************************************************** 
MUNRO, Donald Connaughton (I0002)
 
6
Desmond McLory Esq
6 Sandfield
Castletown
Isle of Man
IM9 1EG

(29 March 2001)



I would introduce myself as the son of Donald Connaughton Munro, your First Cousin Once Removed.

I have traced you through the good offices of The Charterhouse and the present owner of your former home in Castletown.

I do hope you do not feel I am intruding.

For some many years now I have engaged in Family History research and have assembled quite a substantial body of documentation. I have also traced a number of cousins, including Third Cousins descended from Thomas Munro (1835-73). He was my great-grandfather's brother.

Your line, descended from Charles Connaughton Munro through your mother, is a collateral line that has largely escaped me. Charles died at the age of only 29 and no photographs have come my way. Similarly his father, Donald, is a great-unknown countenance. (NB: August 2001. NOT descended from Charles Connaughton. Mother was child of Josphine Shellf by her first husband, Thomas Doran. Her second husband was Henry Thomas McLeod Munro)

If you feel able to let me have details of birth, marriages and deaths which are known to you, then I would be most very grateful. I am taking the opportunity of enclosing my chart down from William Munro and Margaret McLeod. The pages are arranged sequentially, from left to right.

If you refer to Page 2 you will see your family group, with the few details known to me. Please enter such additional information as you have, or if you prefer, write separately. Of course, if you come across any errors in the chart, please draw them to my attention.

I can then update the chart and let you have a fair copy. I can also send you extracts from my files and details of the Internet website which I have established. Some commentary on Marie Lloyd is to be found there.

Do I understand Kevin is in America? Do I remember that you had an involvement at one time with the Leatherhead Rep? Two of my children were at St.John's; both now at University.

For the convenience of your reply I am taking the opportunity of enclosing an addressed envelope. I very much look forward to hearing from you.


(Present owner of 40 Castle Street telephoned. My letter 6.11.00 to that address only received 29.3.01
DMcL sold him the house 10 years ago. In frail health; a couple of strokes. Believed aged 75+, late wife Julia.]

RAF Record 1941-1946 received 1 August 2001

AC2 on enlistment. Recommended for training as Observer. LAC 31.12.41. Pilot Officer 22 Mar 1942 Flying Officer 22 Feb 1943. Flight Lieutenant 22 Aug 1944. Last Day of Service 27 August 1946 Relinquished Commission 1 July 1959

"Authorised to wear ribbon of 1939/43 Star - No.254 Squadron". Distinguished Flying Cross.


 
MCCLORY, Desmond Thomas Patrick O'Donovan (I0343)
 
7
Our father the Colonel, we could never use the intimate parental terms such as Dad or Daddy as somehow they did not seem to fit the individual whose infrequent visits to our home, seemed to have little impact on our lives. On his part, there was little indicated desire to play a significant role in the lives of these two boys, his sons and this fell upon our mother, his opposite in every way, a woman of great kindness and humor, liked by everyone and a dedicated mother.

Throughout his life, the Colonel maintained his military bearing, tall and straight backed, and thinning ginger hair combed straight back and cut short. He took much pride in his appearance and dressed well, and expensively, even gardening in fawn camel hair trousers, always a neat paisley cravat tucked into his shirt.

To the outside world he was a local success, a distinguished army officer popular in the local pubs, putting two boys through college, a charming well liked wife, a large house but it really was a facade. Even, I believe, his near and dear family did not see him as we did.

A small monthly stipend to our mother was to support the three of us whilst he spent more on his clothes and his life style, maintaining a discreet apartment in London, club memberships, a liking for good food and wine, and worse of all gambling.

On a couple of rare occasions he took us to the Plumpton Race track,where we picnicked in the sun, placed small bets on horses that inevitably came last, all very innocent and great fun, but far from the heavy betting done by phone with bookies who sometimes would phone demanding payment against losses.

The education was paid mainly by the army and no interest was shown in our progress by the Colonel, any visits to the schools, letters infrequent and always signed 'from your father, Colonel F J Ronald Even when he was home, he never attended school events such as plays, sports days, bonfires when as we looked around we saw the supportive faces of committed parents and in our case, just one, there for us as always.

The amount paid monthly to our Mother was not enough for the family and did not take into account the family allowance he received as a serving army officer and the large house in which we lived was rented and needed investment, never received, to upgrade its facilities.

Certainly, in maintaining his life style the Colonel spent much more than he spent on us, the family of three and even as children we were aware of this.

To eat a satisfying meal then catch our mother in the kitchen wiping bread around the frying pan, to catch the meat juices, because there was not enough money to buy the same food for herself is something I never forgot, or forgave.

In later life when I became a member of the Junior Army and Naval Club,as was the Colonel, I was able to see the extent of his enjoyment of life, his indulgences in fine wine and food, female companions, this life style starting to show in the red mottling of his cheeks and across his nose.

He was a Colonel, a well paid military status with many financial benefits yet he never invested in the home, never bought a house, any luxuries we had bought by our mother from monies earned in jobs she had to take, necessary to meet the household bills. He never took us on annual holidays, or out for dinner, to the movies or went out of his way to make Christmas or Birthdays fun. The only trips I remember with him were to visit our Grandparents in Burgess Hill and one trip overseas to Germany, courtesy of the British Army and where we stayed in unattractive military housing for two weeks and did very little much relieved to get home.

He did not play football with us, or fly kites, teach us children to swim; he did not know where we had ability and where we had none.

One time, he took us to watch the Changing of the Guard, from his office in Whitehall and here he was in his element, introducing us around to fellow officers the picture of the proud father and it was for two small boys an exciting day, the gleaming breastplates and wind blown plumes on the helmets, the precision of movement, the diminutive figure of the Queen erect upon her horse but it was just one day, never repeated, a day when paternal contact could have been made between us, but was not.

As I grew up I lived with the Colonel, after my brother departed to Australia as did our mother, I drank his wine, ate his food, persuaded him to buy me a second hand motorcycle, later a car done with no compunction or guilt because I blamed him for my brother and I growing up basically in a one parent home, missing out on the support yet at the same time I tried to get him involved in my life, my ideas, my desires for the future but there was no interest.


The Colonel fell ill, he died and was buried with the pomp that he would have chosen and enjoyed. His coffin carried by members of the Royal Sussex Regiment, eulogy by a well known comedian, Laurence Percival. The local newspaper wrote a flattering article describing his military career, his talent as a painter and a cook, mentioning so briefly that he had 2 children.


To me it became clear that he was a very lonely man, that he had missed much that could have made his life more productive and certainly much happier. In the last few meetings, on trips to the UK, I had with him he was struggling to establish contact, making a real effort to be a father and grandfather, for the first time ever showing interest in how life was progressing for me and the family. Sometimes from the austere demeanor a sly humor slipped out, surprising me and I felt that there was a much more humane and likeable man imprisoned within and unable to escape to the outside world.

He was certainly a very intelligent man, well educated, a recognized military historian. He was an accomplished cook, most knowledgeable on wines. He was good with his hands as once demonstrated in a surprising gift of a fort made by him, a small coffee table that reposed in his last home and an avid Gardner. His love of art drove him to success in his role as money raiser for the restoration of the arts treasuresin Florence, damaged by the floods. This earned him the title of 'Calviere de alto merito' conferred on him by the Italian Government.A grateful queen gave him the CBE. It therefore is most sad that he never succeeded in being a good husband and a successful father as he would have had a much richer life.

I think a major problem was the gambling as living with him I had an opportunity to see how much of his income was paid out on his betting, little evidence of his success as a punter. He also liked the extravagancies of life, clothing, good food, club member ship all of which would have been beyond the reach of a more committed family man.

Many of his colleagues had bought homes, enjoyed annual holidays with their families, drove nice family cars but they focused on this without the same outside extravagances.

He never bought our Mother jewellery, clothes or birthday and Christmas gifts, he kept her so tight on money that she had to work outside to supplement the household income. After divorce he never even paid her the court stipulated allowance so, with her usual self reliance she worked and supported herself and us.

I have two lasting memories of him. One after a pub lunch with him and Selina and Thomas, both very young, he wandered off and I found him standing by the waters of a reservoir, almost in a trance and he looked so sad. In fact took his picture as clearly shows his expression.

The other memory was on one of my calls to him in hospital shortly before he died. He asked my name and I replied 'Tony'. He then repeated my name as a query so I said' Tony, your son in Singapore" and he laughed and said 'Oh the funny one!' and I hope this refers to my sense of humor and not to any quirks in my character.

He was not a bad man, just one unsuited to be a father and husband and he never realized that actually when we were small, in those early ages of innocence, we were proud to be the sons of the Colonel. The sole legacy given to me by his second wife, Jill, was a bettered leather wallet with a map of Thailand, a gift from me 20 years before and, despite is age and condition, she told me that it had always been in his pocket. I wish I had known him better, I wish he could have shed that military skin, sometimes, and we could have probably been good friends.

TR June 2005

Another draft of this document received by IKM July 2005

The Colonel.

Our father, the Colonel, I could never use intimate parental terms such as 'Dad' or 'Daddy' as somehow they did not seem to fit the individual whose infrequent visits to our home, seemed to have little impact on our lives. On his part, there was little indicated desire to play a significant role in the lives of these two boys, his sons and this fell upon Mum, his opposite in every way, as we know a woman of great kindness and humor, liked by everyone and a dedicated mother.

From school master to soldier, soldier to fund raiser he departed as he would have wished with a formal funeral and with an apparent life of success behind him.

Throughout his life, the Colonel maintained his military bearing, tall and straight backed, and thinning ginger hair combed straight back and cut short. He took much pride in his appearance and dressed well, and expensively, even gardening in fawn camel hair trousers, always a neat paisley cravat tucked into his shirt. He looked every inch that of an army officer. With a keen interest in the supposed Scottish antecedent of the Family,he often would wear a M......... (reference to tartan?)

To the outside world, he was a local success, a distinguished army officer popular in the local pubs, putting two boys through college, a charming well liked wife, a large house but it really was a facade. Even, I believe, his near and dear family did not see him as I did.

A small monthly stipend to our mother was made to support the three of us whilst he spent more on his clothes and his life style, maintaining a discreet apartment in London, club memberships, a liking for good food and wine, and worse of all gambling. He received a formal family allowance from the Army as never reached Mum, School fees was paid by the Army.

On a couple of rare occasions he took us to the Plumpton Race track,where we picnicked in the sun, placed small bets on horses that inevitably came last, all very innocent and great fun, but far from the heavy betting done by phone with bookies who sometimes would phone demanding payment against losses. Living in his home, later, I often was the initial recipient of calls from bookies.

As said, education was paid mainly by the army and no interest was shown in our progress by the Colonel, any visits to the schools, letters infrequent and always signed 'from your father, Colonel F J Ronald'. Even when he was home, he never attended school events such as plays, sports days, bonfires when as we looked around we saw the supportive faces of committed parents and in our case, just one, there for us as always.

The amount paid monthly to our Mother was not enough for the family and did not take into account the family allowance he received as a serving army officer and the large house in which we lived was only rented and needed investment, never received, to upgrade its facilities. Mum had to work to support us, keep food on the table, and give us luxuries at Christmas and on our birthdays. From comics and small gifts on Sunday visits home after church to clothes, to holidays these came from monies earned by Mum.


Certainly, in maintaining his life style the Colonel spent much more than he spent on us, the family of three and even as a child I was aware of this.

Rental of 27 Vicarage Walk, the family home was ?2 more a month than father's private I bedroom apartment in London. The housing allowance from the Army was actually more than the rental of the Vicarage Walk home. The family allowance paid by the army was more than the monthly allowance paid to Mum .In May 1962, Mum wrote to the Paymaster General asking for an update on family allowance. As a result, her monthly allowance from the Colonel increased by 1/3rd.



To eat a satisfying meal then catch our mother in the kitchen wiping bread around the frying pan, to catch the meat juices, because there was not enough money to buy the same food for herself is something I never forgot, or forgave.

In later life, when I became a member of the Junior Army and Naval Club, as was the Colonel, I was able to see the extent of his enjoyment of life, his indulgences in fine wine and food, female companions, this life style starting to show in the red mottling of his cheeks and across his nose. I saw Mrs. Sitwell and his other companions in the club bar, during my use overnight of the bedroom facilities available to members at less than hotel prices.

Mum married father because in a letter to her, dated January 16th 1940,he stressed that he was to be sent overseas unlikely to return, a letter now in my ownership, begs her to marry him and like many women she agreed, in similar circumstances, and like many whose husbands returned, she lived to regret it. In fact, remaining as a staff officer, father's exposure to war conditions was minimal although he did serve in France and with credit, earning a mention in dispatches, and he proved a cold and distant husband, preferring the company of other women and his fellow officers.

I quote:

Peggy my dear,

War calls for sacrifice and I expect to be drafted soon overseas and like so many of my fellow officers, may never return, gladly laying down my life for King and country.

I am extremely fond of you and beg you to consider us getting married so that we can enjoy some bliss together before the fatal day comes.

Married to you will give me more courage to do my duty when the time comes.

Affectionately
John

They married on the 18th March 1940, in the Church of St Thomas More, Seaford. Rev. RG Webb officiated and witnesses were John Thomas Ronald, Francis J Ronald, Hollis Breadon Coulhurst. Deputy registrar was George Henry Charles Bishop.

They were divorced on the 14th day of November 1963 under the auspices of the High Court of Justice, probate, divorce and admiralty division decree nisi 1597 no 7250.63 this taking effect,3 months later, on the 18th day of February 1964.

The divorce based on desertion by Mum for a period of 3 years and not contested.

Mum started to actually hate him when, he did his best to prevent her from visiting her beloved brother, a highly courageous Wing Commander, in the fore front of aerial warfare and who died on a mission over Germany. I am sure Father was jealous of the affection and jealous of the reputation of her brother as a true hero eventually winning, posthumously, the DFC. In a letter, dated June 11th, now also in my possession, the Colonel rants on about Wilfred, the relationship and says:

"As your husband, I forbid you to visit or have any contact with your brother, Wilfred, as he is irresponsible and not a good influence on you! You will obey me or I shall take appropriate steps"
John

Written across the letter in Mum's writing it says:

'Bloody Bastard'

Wilfred was a dashing, air force pilot who passed out of RAF College with honors in 1933, typical of the pilots of the era who spent so much of their life, in the air, on dangerous missions, with a high death rate amongst them as tendered to make them more wild living when back home, never knowing when they would go on a one way journey.

Interesting, as at the time the Colonel was having an affair with a (Mrs.) Eleanor O'Neill, her husband, a Major in a Transport Unit, (the wife living in Burgess Hill), transferred abroad to France and I am not sure why he resented his brother-in-law so much because it did divert the attention of his wife away from his activities.


He was a Colonel, a well paid military status with many financial benefits yet he never invested in the home, never bought a house, any luxuries we had bought by our mother from monies earned in jobs she had to take, necessary to meet the household bills. He never took us, save once, on annual holidays, or out for dinner, to the movies or went out of his way to make Christmas or Birthdays fun. The only trips I remember with him were to visit our Grandparents in Burgess Hill and one trip overseas to Germany, courtesy of the British Army and where we stayed in unattractive military housing for two weeks and did very little, apart from a day in Wuppertal, much relieved to get home.

He did not play football with us, or fly kites, teach us children to swim; he did not know where we had ability and where we had none.

One time, he took us to watch the Changing of the Guard, from his office in Whitehall and here he was in his element, introducing us around to fellow officers the picture of the proud father and it was for two small boys an exciting day, the gleaming breastplates and wind blown plumes on the helmets, the precision of movement, the diminutive figure of the Queen erect upon her horse but it was just one day, never repeated, a day when paternal contact could have been made between us, but was not.

As I grew up I lived with the Colonel, after my brother departed to Australia as did our mother, I drank his wine, ate his food, persuaded him to buy me a second hand motorcycle, later a car, done with no compunction or guilt because I blamed him for my brother and I growing up basically in a one parent home, missing out on the father's support yet at the same time I still tried to get him involved in my life, my ideas, my desires for the future but there was no interest.


The Colonel fell ill, he died and was buried with the pomp that he would have chosen and enjoyed. His coffin carried by members of the Royal Sussex Regiment, eulogy by a well known comedian, Laurence Percival. The local newspaper wrote a flattering article describing his military career, his talent as a painter and a cook, mentioning so briefly that he had 2 children.


To me it became clear that he was a very lonely man, that he had missed much that could have made his life more productive and certainly much happier. In the last few meetings, on trips to the UK, I had with him he was struggling to establish contact, making a real effort to be a father and grandfather, for the first time ever showing interest in how life was progressing for me and the family. Sometimes from the austere demeanor a sly humor slipped out, surprising me and I felt that there was a much more humane and likeable man imprisoned within and unable to escape to the outside world. I remember once he joked about his escape from the Germans, saying that when they awoke in the morning their captors had disappeared, forgotten them or deemed the 'catch' not worth keeping.

On another occasion, creeping back home in the 'wee' hours of the morning with a friend I woke him up and he came downstairs at 2 am dressed in a morning suit, posing as my butler to produce coffee and biscuits. This to me was the man inside, less austere, a good sense of humor struggling to get out.

He was certainly a very intelligent man, well educated, a recognized military historian. He was an accomplished cook, most knowledgeable on wines. He was good with his hands as once demonstrated in a surprising gift of a fort made by him, a small coffee table that reposed in his last home and an avid gardener. His love of art drove him to success in his role as money raiser for the restoration of the arts treasures, in Florence, damaged by the floods. This earned him the title of 'Cavaliere de Alto Merito' conferred on him by the Italian Government. In fact, he displayed artistic merit with several credible paintings. A grateful queen gave him the CBE, the Lord Mayor of London, a Gold Medal. It, therefore, is most sad that he never succeeded in being a good husband and a successful father as he would have had a much richer life. Whether raising monies for damaged art work, for charities, for organizations such as BUPA, he displayed sound business acumen, judgement and skills and all credit was due to him for the success he made outside the army, post retirement.

Sometimes it is difficult to reconcile his two sides - the successful military officer and fund raiser and the dilettante, absent husband and father.



An interesting letter from Grandmother Protheroe to Mum dated Jan 14th 1973 says. Quote

Dear Peggy,

I have lately felt I must put right something I should have done a long time ago. You should have left John as you did, you should have divorced him, you had plenty of evidence.

He must have been a swine in bed.

I remember Enid coming round to me (she lived in the little flat with jasper) she said you were throwing everything you could lay your hands on at him. I do not think you ever slept with him again.

I won't go on but you had to borrow my sheets for the beds, and the only blankets you had were army ones he must have filched. I was so cross with you leaving him and taking the boys which you intended to work for and keep. I had always been taught that marriage was for as long as you both shall live, but now things are more reasonable. Its ten years since I was with Josie and I received the Colonel's letter. I was in the kitchen making food. Josie was sorting the mail in the hall when she called how long has
John been calling you My Darling.

Don't be silly I replied read it, and this is what she read.

My Darling, the Queen has had a rush of blood to the head and endowed me with the CBE. I celebrated last night with the boys but kept a special bottle for us whom I will drink from your slipper, my darling.

I enclose the key in case I am not there to meet you.

Your devoted John.

It was quite clear what the clever man had done. He had been writing and used the wrong envelope. It came by sea with a 4p stamp. I said I would burn the letter but Johnny said keep it and here it is.

He was a real rotter and will come to a sticky end but they say-the devil looks after his own. Anyway although it is late in the day I shall sleep better. I should have done this at once.

Love mother.

The letter should have gone to Mrs. Sitwell father's mistress. The key was for his small but expensive apartment in London. The 'Boys' is not reference to me and my brother but to friends of his.


I think a major problem was the gambling as living with him I had an opportunity to see how much of his income was paid out on his betting, little evidence of his success as a punter. He also liked the extravagancies of life, clothing, good food, club member ship and the companionship of young, vivacious women, all of which would have been beyond the reach or desire of a more committed family man. In fact, this followed exactly the life style of his father and grandfather both of whom ran dual lives

Many of his colleagues had bought homes, enjoyed annual holidays with their families, drove nice family cars but they focused on this without the same outside extravagances.

He never bought our Mother jewellery, clothes or birthday and Christmas gifts, he kept her so tight on money that she had to work outside to supplement the household income. After divorce he never even paid her the court stipulated allowance so, with her usual self reliance she worked and supported herself and us.

I have two lasting memories of him. One after a pub lunch with him, on a visit to the UK by ourselves, and Selina and Thomas, both very young, he wandered off and I found him standing by the waters of a reservoir, almost in a trance and he looked so sad. In fact, I took his picture as clearly shows his expression.

The other memory was on one of my calls to him in hospital shortly before he died. He asked my name and I replied 'Tony'. He then repeated my name as a query so I said' Tony, your son in Singapore" and he laughed and said 'Oh the funny one!' and I hope this refers to my sense of humor and not to any quirks in my character.

He was not a bad man, just vain, one unsuited to be a father and husband and he never realized that actually when we were small, in those early ages of innocence, we were proud to be the sons of a Colonel. The sole legacy given to me, as eldest son, by his second wife, Jill, was a battered leather wallet with a map of Thailand, a gift from me 20 years before and, despite is age and condition, she told me that it had always been in his pocket. I found this rather touching.

Both parents have now departed, both passed away with sickness and pain and perhaps, at the end, they had a chance to look back on their lives and feel some sense of regret for what could have been, opportunities lost, actions regretted but this we will never know.

Received by IKM from (John) Tony Ronald in July 2005 
RONALD, Francis John (I0163)
 
8 Sarah Jenyns was born on 5 June 1660 at Holywell, Hertfordshire, EnglandG.3 She was the daughter of Richard Jenyns and Frances Thornhurst.4,5 She was baptised on 17 June 1660 at St. Albans Abbey, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, EnglandG.3 She married John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, son of Sir Winston Churchill and Elizabeth Drake, on 1 October 1678.6 She died on 18 October 1744 at age 84 at Marlborough House, London, EnglandG, leaving a fortune of ?3,000,000.3 She was buried at Chapel, Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, EnglandG.7 Her will (dated 11 to 15 Aug 1744) was proven (by probate) in 1744, bequeathing to her first woman, Mrs. Grace Ridley, two portraits of the Duke and one of herself, to the Duchess of Leeds a watercolour portrait of the Duke, and to the Duchess of Montagu a snuff box with two portraits of the Duke and another covered with a large diamond. She left ?500 apiece to a Mr. Richard Glover and Mr. David Mallet, to write an account of the Duke's life from his available papers?which was never written.
She was also known as Sarah Jennings.8 From 1 October 1678, her married name became Churchill. She and Anne Stuart, Queen of Great Britain were associated between 1683 and 1708.9 After her marriage, Sarah Jenyns was styled as Duchess of Marlborough on 14 December 1702.4 She held the office of Keeper of the Privy Purse before 1711.3 She held the office of Mistress of the Robes before 1711.3 She held the office of Groom of the Stole before 1711.3 She wrote the book Conduct From Her First Coming to Court to the Year 1710, published 1742.3
Gibbs quotes a Miss Strickland, "One of her principal charms was a prodigious abundance of fine fair hair."6 She expressed in her will that if her son John or his son were to accept any office or employment under the Crown (other than the Rangerships of Windsor Great and Little Parks), either of them so doing would forfeit all interest in her estate as if he were actually dead. Her estates included the manor of Wimbledon and the mansion at Wimbledon Park which she had recently built.10 She has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.

Source: www.thepeerage.com

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10517.htm#c105170.3
 
JENYNS, Sarah (I1297)
 
9 Australian Magazine article June 2005 - The Jaguar Drivers Club Queensland


SOAK UP THE NOSTALGIA

One of the most famous E-Types of all time was offered and sold recently at an auction in the U.K. It was one of the very first right-hand drives which held the celebrated registration 'CUT 7'-it sold for the sum of ?275,000 (A$670,568). The story that now unfolds is one of the driver behind the car and his relationship with Jaguar.

History is the Biography of great men
(Thomas Carlyle 1795-1881)

Dick Protheroe 1922 - 1966

Our story begins during the Second World War years when a young man in his early twenties joined the RAF. Elmer Richard Protheroe, better known as Dick Protheroe received flying training at Cranwell to go onto serving as a pilot in the Bomber Command flying Wellingtons and Lancasters.
Between the years of '44-49 he completed operational tours with the Pathfinder Force No. 7 squadron; seconded to BOAC and flew on a Berlin Airlift in 1947 to return to the Royal Air Force in 1949. His flying experience continued with a three year spell of duty as a test pilot and then went onto training aircrews on the Vickers Valiant and Handley Page Victor between '54-57. Dick was the only one-eyed RAF pilot allowed to fly Valiant aircraft. He lost an eye in a racing accident in the 50's.
Dick was a young man who acquired valuable experience in wide engineering and flying while serving in the RAF and it proved to be of immense value to him not only in engine tuning but also in developing racing cars.

During the war he was allocated a meagre petrol ration which gave him the opportunity to run a variety of cars, including an International Aston Martin.

In 1947 Dick acquired a monoposto Austin 7, previously raced by Peter Clark. A car which although fairly successful in sprints and hill-climbs, required an engine re-build as Dick discovered there is a limit to peak revs in any given engine. In that same year 1947, he obtained a Type 37 Bugatti. Although the car was suppose to come mechanically perfect with a racing history Dick found out that yet again this was not so and a complete re-build was carried out. Once finished the car was re-sprayed in Dick's adopted racing colour French Racing Blue. The car was then successfully raced at Grandsen Lodge coming in second behind George Abecassis.

In 1952 whilst serving in Egypt, he obtained his very first X120-this aluminium bodied car was modified and raced successfully at local motor clubs. He jokingly referred to it as an Ancient Egyptian he'd found by the Pyramids and the nickname passed into motor racing mythology. In 1953 the 'Ancient Egyptian', was brought to England and re-registered as GPN 635 (pic. on the right of the car in '53 and more recently). During the following years there were many progressive modifications performed on the car whilst racing at the famous Goodwood track. It was it was originally a left hand drive car, and was raced as such in Britain, but it was eventually converted to right hand drive.
Protheroe was a gutsy driver and he and the Ancient Egyptian very quickly became one of the most popular car/driver combinations in British national racing. Crowds loved Dick's attitude; if he didn't win it was never for the want of trying and, along with its many trophies, the Ancient Egyptian had its share of spins and scrapes.

Dick recalls in his biography the many famous racing names of Mike Read, Duncan Hamilton, Mike Hawthorn etc and feels that those were the days when racing was still a sport and the occasional nudge was permissible. There was no such thing as 'wild driver's who completely 'lost it' and took others with them. I hate to wonder what he would think of racing in the 21st Century!
Dick recalls a time when at a Gold Cup Meeting at Oulton Park he was driving the ill-fated 7 GNO. Having carried out all tuning modifications on the engine, the brakes failed during the race at the Lodge, allowing Duncan Hamilton to breathe down his neck. Despite this Dick manoeuvred the car in such a way that avoided being overtaken by Duncan and was still able to drive away in the lead again. Duncan driving a Jaguar at the time had become rather frustrated and after a few more laps gave Dick's car an almighty boot up the bracket and shortened his tail by 18 inches. However much to Duncan's despair, the tail was empty and Dick was still able to reach the flag before him. Dick light-heartedly did not let Duncan forget this incident however in his opinion there are few drivers of Duncan's stature to be seen on the circuits now.

In the years to follow Dick continued to drive Jaguars except for in 1958 when he used an Austin Healey 100s. A car after a great deal of modifications won almost every race for Dick. Before the delivery of 'CUT 7', he raced successfully with GPN 635 and also another XK120, which were fitted with disc brakes and Weber carburettors. At the time of his biography he also possessed another XK120 'CUT6' (pic. above) with yet again every possible modification including a 3.8 engine. It completed it's first real race at the first Clubman's Championships in 1961 and beat all the E-Types, much to everyone surprise.
It is now 1961 and Jaguar E-Type chassis number `860004`, a right-hand drive fixed head coupe, fitted with engine number `R1103-9 and the fourth E-Type ever built, was delivered as a birthday present for Dick's wife. The roadster was prepared for racing by Dick's own very capable team.
Car and driver then raced extensively, not just in Club events, but also at International level during the 1962 season. Indeed, Dick's results in a car prepared in his own workshops were truly amazing and make impressive reading - 3rd Snetterton 24 March, 6th Oulton Park 7 April, 1st Mallory Park 23 April, 1st and 3rd in two races Silverstone 28 April, these are just a small handful of what Dick was capable of as a knowledgeable racing driver. His target in that first season was to secure the Autosport National Championship for Production Sports Cars and, with just one retirement in ten outings due to a broken throttle cable, he took the over 3-litre class win and was awarded the Norbury Trophy after four victories, two lap records and never finishing lower than sixth overall. Most noteworthy of all, though, was his sixth overall in the International category RAC Tourist Trophy 100 lap classic at Goodwood, where he and his trusty E-Type took a third in class behind only the two Ferrari 250GTOs driven by outright winner Innes Ireland and that year's F1 World Champion, Graham Hill.


Sadly the great man lost his life at the wheel of the "large rear engined sports car" the Ferrari P220 in a practice crash for the 1966 TT at Oulton Park. It is people like Dick who were the pioneers of racing and through their courage, skill and achievements makes car racing one of the most watched and loved sports around the world.

My sincere gratitude goes to Geoff Protheroe, son of Dick for allowing me to share this story with our members about a true legend of the racing track.

To finish off a little bit about Geoff himself:

I work for a large international telecommunication company in the IT/network dept. In my 20's 30's I had moderate success in the rallying / stage events in the UK firstly in a 1000cc mini then a rally prepared Hillman Imp. During the 90's I navigated for several people in International Classic events including London to Monte Carlo, Paris to Marrakesh and John O'Groats to Lands End. Most of these events were with my step brother Peter in his highly prepared Austin Healey 100. Recently I have bought a Toyota MR2 series 2 which I am preparing for hill-climb / time trials next year.

I am sure we all wish Geoff great success in his racing career. 
PROTHEROE, Elmer Richard (I0939)
 
10 John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough was born on 24 June 1650 at Ashe, Devon, England. He was the son of Sir Winston Churchill and Elizabeth Drake. He was baptised on 28 June 1650 at Axminster, Devon, England. He married Sarah Jenyns, daughter of Richard Jenyns and Frances Thornhurst, on 1 October 1678.4 He died on 16 June 1722 at age 71 at Cranbourne Lodge, Windsor, Berkshire, England. He was buried on 9 August 1722 at Palace of Westminster, Westminster, London, England. His will (dated 19 March 1721/2) was proven (by probate) on 6 July 1722, "bequeathing as heirlooms at Blenheim the gold plate with the Elector of Hanover's arms engraved theron, and the diamond sword given to him by the Emperor". He was buried in 1744 at Chapel, Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England, in accordance with his will.
He was educated at St. Paul's School, London, England. He gained the rank of officer in 1667 in the Army (Foot Guards). He held the office of Page of Honour to James, Duke of York in 1667. He and Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland were associated circa 1668. He fought in the campaign in Tangiers between 1668 and 1671. He fought in the campaigns in Flanders from 1672 to 1673, under the Duke of Monmouth. He held the office of Gentleman of the Bedchamber to James, Duke of York in 1673. He fought in the Battle of Enzheim in 1674, under the command of the French under Vicomte de Turenne.7 He held the office of Master of the Wardrobe in 1679.3 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Newtown, Isle of Wight between February 1679 and July 1679. He was created 1st Lord Churchill of Eyemouth, co. Berwick [Scotland] on 21 December 1682. He gained the rank of Colonel in 1683 in the Royal Dragoons. He held the office of Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company from 1683 to 1691. He gained the rank of Colonel in November 1683 in the Royal Regiment of Dragoons. He held the office of Ambassador to France from March 1685 to April 1685. He was created 1st Baron Churchill of Sandridge, co. Hertford [England] on 14 May 1685. He fought in the Battle of Sedgemoor in June 1685, where he defeated the rebels under the Duke of Monmouth. He gained the rank of Lieutenant-General in 1688.8 On 24 November 1688 he was one of the first to desert the King, using his hatred of Popery as his excuse, supporting the accession of the Prince and Princess of Orange. Gibbs quotes Chesteron, "Churchill, as if to add something ideal to his imitation of Iscariot, went to James with wanton professions of love and loyalty, went forth in arms as if to defend the country from invasion, and then calmly handed over the country to the invader." He fought in the Battle of Walcourt in 1689, where his Dutch force defeated the French under Marshal d'Humerires. He held the office of Gentleman of the Bedchamber from 1689 to 1692. He was appointed Privy Counsellor (P.C.) on 14 February 1688/89.8 He was created 1st Earl of Marlborough, co. Wilts [England] on 9 April 1689.8 He gained the rank of commander in 1690 in the the English forces in the Netherlands. In 1692 he was dismissed from most of his posts, for well grounded suspicion of intrigues with the exiled King James II, as well as, according to Evelyn, for 'his excessive taking of bribes, covetousness, and extortion on all occasions, from his inferior officers.4' He held the office of Cabinet Minister in 1698.4 He held the office of Master of the Horse from 1698 to 1700.He gained the rank of Commander-in-Chief in June 1701 in the British and Dutch forces in the Netherlands. He held the office of Master General of the Ordnance in 1702. He held the office of Ambassador to The Hague in 1702. He gained the rank of Captain General in 1702 in the English forces at home and abroad, as well as Generalissmo of the Allied forces. He was appointed Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) on 14 March 1701/2. He was created 1st Marquess of Blandford [England] on 14 December 1702. He was created 1st Duke of Marlborough [England] on 14 December 1702. He fought in the Battle of Donauwerth on 2 June 1704 at Donauw?rth, Bayern, Germany, against the Bavarians, whom he defeated. He fought in the Battle of Blenheim on 13 August 1704 at Blindheim, Germany, against the French, whom he soundly defeated. He was created Prince John of the Holy Roman Empire on 28 August 1704, by Emperor Leopold. On 28 January 1704/5 he was granted the manor of Woodstock (about 22,000 acres), and the hundred of Wotton in Oxfordshire, where he subsequently built Blenheim Palace. The total cost of this Palace was £300,000, of which only £60,000 was spent by the Marlboroughs, with the balance from the Civil List. He fought in the Battle of Tirlemont on 18 July 1705 at Tirlemont He was created Prince John of Mindleheim [Holy Roman Empire]| by the Emperor Joseph, which he subsequently exchanged in 1713 for the Principality of Mellenburg on 18 November 1705. He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Oxfordshire from 1706 to 1712. He fought in the Battle of Ramilles on 23 May 1706 at Ramilles On 21 December 1706 he obtained an Act of Parliament to allow his title of Duke of Marlborough (and subsidiary titles) to descend through his four daughters to their male and female heirs. He fought in the Battle of Oudenarde on 11 July 1708 at Oudenaarde, Belgium He fought in the Battle of Malplaquet on 11 September 1709 at Malplaquet He fought in the Battle of Arluex on 5 August 1711 at Arleux, France He fought in the Battle of Bouchain on 13 September 1711 at Bouchain, FranceG.4 On 30 December 1711 he was again dismissed from most of his offices, although with the accession of George II, he was restored to most them in 1714. Jesse writes, "a commission, appointed to examine into the public accounts, reported that among other evidences of corruption and abuse, there was full proof of the Duke having received in the shape of a bribe an annual present of ?5,000 or ?6,000 from the contractors of bread for the army." In 1713 he exchanged the Principality of Mindleheim in Swabia for the county of Mellenburg (then erected into a Principality) in Upper Austria.


Cockayne quotes Macky, "The Duke of York's love for [Arabella Churchill] his sister [by whom he was father of the Duke of Berwick and other children] first brought him to Court, and the beauty of his own person and his good address so gained on the Duchess of Cleveland [then mistress to Charles II] that she effectually established him there." Cockayne also claims, "he is said to have intrigued with the said Duchess and to have received large sums of money from her."

On his death, the Lordship of Churchill of Eyemouth became extinct. He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.

Source: www.thepeerage.com

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10539.htm#i105385


 
CHURCHILL, John (I1296)
 
11 **Black Velvet at the Hippodrome Nov 1939**


Quotation from Outbreak 1939 by Terry Charman - published by Virgin 2009

" The review Black Velvet, starring Churchill's son-in-law Vic Oliver, opened at the Hippodrome.

It too pleased Punch's critic: "It makes no notable contribution to the arts, but is very much what is wanted. Gay from the outset, it has a generous number of good turns and is constantly brightened by the personality of Vic Oliver." Appearing were ALICE LLOYD, "who gives an excellent imitation of her ever-to-be-lamented sister Marie"

The show received the royal seal of approval when the King and Queen and the Dukes and Duchesses of Gloucester and Kent made an informal visit on 27 November" 
WOOD, Alice Mary Ellen (I0088)
 
12 1st XI Football Chigwell School 1890

Captain of Cricket Chigwell School 1891

Powell Shield Chigwell School 1891

Headmaster's Leaving Prize Book 1891  
MUNRO, Henry Thomas MacLeod (I0354)
 
13 A SCOTS / IRISH FAMILY IN THE EAST END OF LONDON
First published 1980 in the Journal of the East of London
Family History Society
Republished in the Journal 1999
Again Revised 2002/8

Great-grandfather Donald Munro was born in Tain, County of Ross in Scotland on 25 September 1832 and came to London probably around 1850. In July 1858 he married a Miss Connaughton at St. Anne's R.C.Church, Underwood Street (now Underwood Road), Mile End New Town, and was then able to retire from a linen drapery business in New Road, Whitechapel.
His bride, Elizabeth Connaughton, was aged 27, born in the parish of St. George in the East and the daughter of Charles Connaughton, an Irishman.

In 1851 Elizabeth's family were living in Baker's Row, Whitechapel and her father was described in the census as a gas fitter. I believe he prospered through that business and property development, for although he had died by the time of his daughter's marriage in 1858, a week before the wedding his widow made a settlement of property on Elizabeth.
Great-grandfather then became involved in local government, served on the Whitechapel Vestry and the Metropolitan Board of Works (predecessor to the London County Council) and as a Churchwarden and Poor Law Guardian. He joined the Tower Hamlets Volunteer Rifles on its establishment in 1861. Photographs from 1878, taken from a Memorial Album, show Major Munro and fellow officers of the 7th Tower Hamlets VR. These photographs, most kindly provided by George Collings, are included on the website.

In November 1858 the Pavilion Theatre was built in Baker's Row, the developer being named in the magazine The Builder as "Miss Connaughton (Mrs Donald Munro)".
After the death of Elizabeth Munro in 1894, leases on the theatre were granted to various parties, the address now being 191/3 Whitechapel Road.

It became the centre of entertainment in the Jewish East End. Yiddish Theatre Groups used it in the 1890s, and from 1906 until closure in 1935, seasons of Yiddish Theatre were the main attraction. Donald Munro, Elizabeth's son, had been Director in 1905. There had been a theatre on the site since 1828 (known as the New Royal). Capacity had been 3500 in 1865, 2650 after reconstruction in 1874, with the final large alterations completed in 1894, the year of Elizabeth's death. The architect was her son-in-law, Ernest Runtz, one of her Executors charged with completing the alterations after her death.

In the Dramatic Register of 1851 the Lessee had been quoted as Richard Thorne. Elsewhere the date given is from 1845. In a modestly amusing irony, Donald Munro's obituary in 1888 gave him as marrying a Miss Thorne, and thereby acquiring property and means to enable him to enter local politics. This, of course, was incorrect. The Pavilion Theatre, and the Baker's Row land, came with his true bride-to-be, Elizabeth Connaughton's Marriage Settlement of July 1858.

The theatre was demolished in 1961.

Donald Munro's predecessor but one as Director of the Theatre was Morris Abrahams (from 4 September 1871). This gentleman served under Donald's father as a Commissioner of the Whitechapel Public Baths and Wash-Houses in 1880, when the former was Chairman. The first Commissioners were appointed in 1874. An example of Victorian family and business connections.

Information appearing here about the Pavilion Theatre prompted by a Jewish Immigration Exhibition, Sutton Public Library, January 2004, and material sourced by Mrs Jennie Bissett, to whom grateful thanks is extended.

Donald and Elizabeth Munro had three sons who went into City professions, Charles as a solicitor (he was admitted in 1884 and died in 1892 aged 29), Harry as a stockbroker (he died in 1956), and Donald (named after his father), my grandfather, as an insurance broker.

The religious aspect is interesting. Elizabeth Munro was Roman Catholic, and she married in a Roman Catholic Church. However, her children appear to have been brought up Anglican, and her husband served as an Anglican churchwarden. For those times it would have been very unusual for the children not to be brought up as Catholics. Irene, daughter of the eldest child, Mary Anne, who married an architect, Ernest Runtz, in 1883, converted to Catholicism on her marriage to Frank Ronald in 1907. That line has continued Roman Catholic, but my grandfather and his brother's line have been Anglicans. Ernest Runtz's background was Non-Conformist. Quite an ecumenical mix. It can be noted, in this context, that in 2007 a lady member of the Munro family was ordained in the Church of England. In 2008 she preached at Evensong in a college chapel in Oxford.

As the family fortunes grew, my great-grandparents moved out to Chigwell, then to Chigwell Row, and sent their sons to Chigwell School. Donald, the father, himself became a Governor of the School in 1882. He was gazetted Colonel of the Tower Hamlets in 1884, and had a full military funeral in 1888 at the City of London Cemetery in Manor Park E12. In his Will he left some ?25,000 to his widow.

The East End connection was maintained through my grandfather's directorship of the Pavilion Theatre and his marriage in 1899 to Daisy Wood, a younger sister of Marie Lloyd the music hall star. Daisy's own success on the Halls, to which she returned when grandfather's health failed around 1908 - he died in 1911 aged only 39 - was the saving of the prosperity built up by great-grandfather. She retired in 1928, having put my father through public school and a spell at the London School of Economics. She and other members of the family lost heavily in the Stock Exchange crash of 1929 which hammered the family stockbroking firm, but she lived on to 1961 in dignified comfort, with a great sense of humour. I have her press cuttings book still, and remember tales told to me as a child of Music Hall life. In 2004 a great-grandson achieved a Choral Award at Oxford. From music hall to Oxford college chapel had taken a little over 100 years.

I was fortunate in my early researches in the Mile End Library. Mr.Watton, particularly, was very helpful. I have seen three original deeds (the earliest 1863) to which great-grandfather was a party, and also found mention of him in Vestry Minute books and other local government records.

Great-grandfather's solicitor was a Henry Sadler Mitchell of 5 Great Prescot Street, Whitechapel, who was Clerk to the Vestry, and to various other Public Boards.
In the years since this short article was originally written contact has been established with other branches of the family, the Runtzs and Ronalds, descended from great-grandfather's first born daughter, who were connected to the Birkbeck Building Society & Bank and the Law Guarantee & Trust Society, two financial institutions of the Victorian era that failed in the early years of the 20th century. A comprehensive history of the family's links with these institutions entitled "Family Connections" was written by my cousin Joan Ronald in 1986, and a copy is deposited in the libraries of the RIBA and Building Societies Association. Contact has also been made with Maurice Munro, descended from great-grandfather's brother Thomas (1835-73). Maurice's father, and the author's, were both born in 1902. As Third Cousins we share that coincidence.

My children, and nephews, now have available to them a substantial body of documentation, back to evidence of their great-great-great-grandfather's marriage to Margaret MacLeod on 23 December 1831. They were born in 1807 and 1806 respectively, he most interestingly in England, she in Tain. Margaret's birth is shown in parish records as 14 January 1806, but she lost a year on marriage. A not unknown occurrence. Her parents were Thomas MacLeod (weaver) and Catherine Matherson. The County of Ross has been the home of the Clan Munro (vassals to the Earls of Ross) for centuries. For nearly 150 years, however, all of William Munro's known direct descendants have been living in England, where he was born.
Furthermore, my wife and I married on 23 December, not knowing then of the significance. They do say history repeats itself.

Ian Munro November 2008

*************************************************************************************************************************************

Whitechapel District - Metropolitan Board of Works
George Starkins Wallis 1855-1865
Thomas Brushfield 1865-75
Colonel Donald Munro (1875-1888). Munro took seat following death of Brushfield, 8 October 1875

George Ilsey (1888-1889) . Ilsey took seat following death of Munro 18 May 1888

MBW succeeded by London County Council 1889
***************************************************************************************************************************************

For Wikipedia entry refer to My Documents/ Family History / Metropolitan Board of Works 
MUNRO, Colonel Donald (I0013)
 
14 According to email from Jonathon Leigh on 1 Nov 2012 Rosie had children, including Winifred Ward (Male Impersonator c.1910), whose daughter Polly Ward was in films in the 1930s. Leading lady, cast against George Formby.

However Adrian Barry of the Musical Guild of Great Britain & America wrote in Oct 2016

" Rosie married William Harry Govett aka Will Poluski junior in 1908 and he is the brother of Winifred Ward, who is the mother of Polly Ward. Winifred's father is Will Poluski senior (William Nelson Govett) of The Poluski Brothers."

 
WOOD, Rosetta Beatrice (I0107)
 
15 Address by Brian ****** on 16 February 2008



John Runtz

A warm welcome to you all.

It is my privilege, as his friend and as President of the Old Georgians' Association, to say a few words about John, who we are remembering here today in the chapel of St George's college where he was a pupil, as were his brothers - Jimmy and Peter - Fr Anthony of the Josephite Community here and in the USA and for a time Parish Priest of Addlestone.

The St George's link is a very strong one, for the boys' Father, Jack , was also an Old Georgian and President of the Association.

He it was who stood sponsor for me at my Confirmation in the old, homely and welcoming Chapel of those days.

John left St George's in1943 and immediately enlisted in RAF, where he was selected for Pilot training. But the supply, after years of shortage, outstripped demand so he re-mustered as an Air Gunner, reaching the rank of Sergeant.

Being Air Crew, with the Brevet, was a coveted mark of distinction in those days and remains so.

The coming of Peace enabled him to pick up his sporting career and he was soon playing for Rosslyn Park, a notable First Class Club, and for Surrey in the Championship .He achieved eminence in the game as known and respected player, with many favourable Press reports, something perhaps not fully understood in these days of Professionalism. Later he was Captain of the Esher Club.

He was a significant presence at St George's in my time here and he played each year in the Old Georgians' Rugby Match against the College. How proud we were to be on the same field as him and how encouraging he was to us all. We could well appreciate his skill and flair. The match had status when he played.

When Boxing was reintroduced for a time he was our instructor, an admirable one - so light on his feet and so quick. But he watched over us and made sure that nobody was ever severely hurt. Skill was the thing. At other times he was seen to effect on the Cricket and Hockey fields

More recently my wife and I were very pleased to welcome him for meals to our home in Addlestone. Many were the good talks we had of other days and their happenings.

We spoke of things which are important and which bring happy memories.

And so, we are gathered to recall him in memory in the Chapel of St George's, a place which meant a lot to him and where he figured prominently and where wandering s and uncertainties fall away. We call him to mind and think of him in our prayers, for which purpose we are here, together with Yvonne, today.  
RUNTZ, John William (I0066)
 
16 Advertisement in Hackney & Kingsland Gazette of 6 Dec 1871 for Kingsland Birkbeck Schools at Ridley Road Opposite Old Railway Station gives James Runtz (brother) as Head Master.

Archivist files from 2009 provided by Richard Clarke Senior Lecturer in Conservation at Birkbeck University of London held by Ian Munro - author of www.munro-tain.com website 
RUNTZ, John (I0069)
 
17 Alleged to have appeared in FLORADORA.

However, records for production fail to confirm. Opened at Lyric 18.11.1899 ran for 455 performances. Again at the Lyric 20.2.1915, transferring to Aldwych 19 April. 65 performances. Book and Music by Owen Hall and Leslie Stuart. Lyrics by Boyd Jones and Paul Reubens

First husband George Doran suffered brain damage following a fall in the Italian Alps. Marriage said to have been annulled. (Source: Gordon Munro September 2001) 
SCHELFF, Jane Maria (I0407)
 
18 Best Lower Certificate of Oxford & Cambridge in his year. Chigwell School 1886.

Prizebook "Sheridan's Plays" dedicated by Canon Swallow, Headmaster. Now in possession of his grandson, Ian Kenneth Munro. Rebound December 2000.

Address in 1899, Ashley Gardens Westminster, referred to in The Times (London) on17 April 2001 as "built in 1894 on swampy ground that was formerly a prison".

Churchmanship in Baptismal Church St Dunstan's and All Saints Stepney described on website in 2015 as " Modern inclusive Anglo-Catholic

Liberal Anglo-Catholicism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberal_Anglo-Catholicism
 
MUNRO, Donald Alexander (I0003)
 
19 Biography: http://soundofthehound.com/absent-friends/sterling-louis-1879-1958/ .Originally published Gramaphone Magazine July 1958

Donation of Library (c.4000 volumes) to Senate House Library London University from 1954. Awarded Hon D.Litt.

Here follows article in Times Literary Supplement of 4 February 1939 describing Sterling's library

http://senatehouselibrary.ac.uk/our-collections/special-collections/printed-special-collections/tls-1939/

Business Career : http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Louis_Saul_Sterling

DNB Article. Erroneously records born in New York on 31 May 1879. Evidence sourced by IKM points to "Lithuania Russian Empire" on 16 May 1879.

Birth name not established. Anecdote quotes Sterling as saying that when he arrived in the UK he adopted the name of the epitome of the British Empire, the currency. Another anecdote was that on being Knighted by George VI, in answer to a question by the King, he replied that his first night in England was spent as "a guest of your father Sir", That is in a police cell, having celebrated his arrival rather too well. Anecdotes relayed to IKM by his Aunt, Dorothy Munro, who was married briefly to his step-son, George Kent.

Furthermore the DNB article gives maiden name of his wife Cissy as Stevens, whereas IKM records it as Kantorwicz, born in Germany. She was the widow of Julian Wilford Kandt, who died 19 June 1919. She married Sterling on 17 Sept 1919.

Probate Valuation of Estate 20 January 1959 was ?667,250. 
STERLING, Louis Saul (I1178)
 
20 Certain military records identified through Ancestry.co.uk April 2010

Medal Roll & WWI Pension Records

Regimental Number 6122

Research now to be undertaken at TNA


***************************************************************************************************
Occupation "Retired Army Warrant Officer & Fitter" on Death Certificate:

The Medal Roll refers to two ranks: Sergeant Fitter and, for Victory Medal, "WO Class II". On daughter's Birth Certificate (1915) rank is given as "Staff Sergeant"

**************************************************************************************************************************

Post Mortem - Open Verdict

"Asphyxia due to drowning while suffering from coronary thrombosis following immersion in River Thames in circumstances not fully disclosed by the evidence"

Inquest held 4th and 11th July 1947

 
HODSON, Harry (I0006)
 
21 Children listed from 1881 Census, excepting Alice. Refer her notes for possible explanation. ARCHER, Thomas Walter George (I0807)
 
22 Consider marriage date 24 July 1858 and birth of first child on 1 March 1859.

Consider Marriage Settlement by her mother one week before the marriage (mention in Will 1894)

Consider E. was Roman Catholic, whilst husband later served as Anglican Church Warden

Reflect on span of children's births:

1859
1863
1868
1870
1872
1873  
CONNAUGHTON, Elizabeth Mary Anne (I0014)
 
23 Consider marriage date 24 July 1858 and birth of first child on 1 March 1859.
Consider Marriage Settlement by her mother one week before the marriage (mention in Will 1894)
Consider E. was Roman Catholic whilst husband later served as Anglican Church Warden
Reflect on span of children's births:
1859
1863
1870
1868
1872
1873  
Family F005
 
24 Could have been the child of her "father's" sister, although registered to Thomas Walter George Archer  ARCHER, Alice Matilda (I0809)
 
25 Created a Baronet of Grimsby in the County of Lincoln



The Company - Consolidated Fisheries Ltd
A brief, chronological outline of the formation and decline of the company.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1896.
Hagerup & Doughty, who already had a very successful business concern in coal, decided to expand into trawler ownership.

Wednesday 3rd March 1897.
Hagerup & Doughty made arrangements for their carriers to carry fish for smacks belonging to Grimsby.

Wednesday 28th April 1897.
The first shipment of ice from Hagerup & Doughty's new ice factory was completed today. Sixty tons were put aboard the cutter City of Glasgow then she put to sea to join the fleet. The ice itself was praised by William Brocklesby, the manager of the ice factory, and by those who used it.

Friday 21st May 1897.
The company announced their intention of increasing the wages of the engineers on their vessels by 2s 6d per week.

Thursday 1st July 1897.
The company applied to the Board of Trade to make regulations regarding the transfer of fish from the trawlers to the carriers of the fleet. The main points were the code of signalling used when the carriers were collecting fish from the fleet, the proper supply of lifejackets, and the duties Skippers had for the safety of the crews.

Friday 17th September 1897.
Hagerup & Doughty turned their ice factory in Robinson Street into a limited liability company to be called 'Hagerup & Doughty Ice Factory and Cold Storage Company Limited', with a starting capital of ?150,000. First directors were Mr. George Doughty MP, Mr. F. Emil Hagerup, and Mr. T. B. Lightfoot, CE

Wednesday 27th October 1897.
Because of a strike, 15 new trawlers were awaiting engines before they could be delivered.

Wednesday 29th December 1897.
Hagerup & Doughty announced their intention of expansion into shipbuilding, having teamed up with James Schofield of Hull. The news was well received in Grimsby.

October 1899.
The first vessel for the newly formed subsidiary, Monarch Steam Fishing, was built. The trawler was named King Arthur in keeping with the 'Monarch's' naming policy.

April 1906.
The company name was changed to Consolidated Steam Fishing and Ice Company.

September 1927.
The company name was simplified to Consolidated Fisheries Limited.

Friday 14th July 1933.
In answer to the question from an associate as to why the new vessels being built were to be named after football teams, John Marsden explained that he got the idea after he had what he described as a 'brainstorm'.

Friday 27th April 1934.
At a meeting of the Grimsby Exchange Limited today, Mr. T. W. Baskcomb resigned the position of chairman and Sir John Denton Marsden, Bart was elected to fill the vacancy. Mr. Marsden said that they should not lose the services of Mr. Baskcomb and proposed that he be appointed a vice-chairman, which was carried unanimously.

Thursday 2nd August 1934.
At a luncheon at the Royal Hotel given by Consolidated Fisheries today, Sir John Marsden spoke about the new vessel for that company, the Grimsby Town, and also informed the gathered dignitaries that he had ordered four new trawlers that would be delivered in November and December of that year.

Friday 10th August 1951.
Appearing before Grimsby Borough magistrates today, radio operator Jack Howden pleaded guilty to breaking into the offices of Consolidated Fisheries and causing some damage. Mr. Howden apologised to the court and offered to pay for the damage he had caused after, he explained, he had been drinking. A radar reflector in the office had been damaged and a fire extinguisher had been sprayed around the room causing damage to furniture. He was fined ?3 and 5s costs.

Friday 3rd September 1954.
John Cole was appointed Joint Managing Director of Consolidated Fisheries. Sir John Marsden became Chairman and Joint Managing Director.

Friday 4th September 1959.
The Goole Shipbuilding and Repairing Co Ltd received orders from Consolidated Fisheries for three more diesel trawlers to be built for the company.

Thursday 30th March 1961.
Consolidated Fisheries was the last company to use 'graining' ? the painting of their vessels superstructure to resemble wood ? although this was being phased out in favour of the company's new colour scheme. This new scheme had the superstructure painted in a buff colour, the black hull of the vessels would sport a light blue sheer line and the boat davits finished in admiralty grey. All external safety railings were painted white and the blue funnel, separated by a white band and black top, carried the full colour crown that had been inherited from the 'Monarch' subsidiary.

Thursday 7th December 1967.
Mr. Don Lister, a former top skipper for Consolidated Fisheries, gave up his sea career to accept the position of outside manager for the company. Succeeding Mr. Jack Mawer who had held the post for 20 years but who was retiring through ill health, Mr. Lister said that he still hoped to make one or to trips a year.
"You have got to if you want to keep up with trends and changes in the industry," he said.

Mr. Lister had been with Consolidated for the past eleven years and had been skipper of the Everton for six of those years.

Thursday 15th February 1968.
Angered by statements that there were inadequate supplies of lifejackets on board their vessels, Mr. Don Lister said that each man had a lifejacket and there were plenty to spare on every vessel. He added that any false accusations might lead to court action.

Thursday 28th August 1969.
The Grimsby Evening Telegraph reported that Consolidated Fisheries were looking into the possibility of buying a stern trawler after they had looked around Hull's C. S. Forester. A feasibility study was being carried out and the estimated cost of building such a vessel for the firm was put at about ?450,000. Obviously impressed by what he saw, Mr. Nigel Marsden said,

"There is no doubt that this is the sort of ship we would build. We believe it would be a success. The only difference being the method of stowing and landing the fish. We are looking at containers as a method of preserving the fish and reducing landing costs. One big Grimsby merchant is already very interested in this."

Thursday 5th March 1970.
Consolidated Fisheries announced that, in just over two months, their fleet of 15 trawlers had grossed ?378,000-the highest in the company's history. It was also disclosed that they were still considering the purchase of a stern trawler to add to the fleet.

Thursday 11th February 1971.
A deal between Consolidated Fisheries and fish merchants Rex Kemp for contract selling was signed. For the coming year, Rex Kemp agreed to buy 100 kits of cod at a fixed price of ?8 per kit every time a Consolidated trawler landed. Mr. Don Lister, the outside manager for Consolidated Fisheries explained the company's actions by saying:

"This is just an experiment with someone who has a little foresight and imagination. We could do with more merchants like Mr. Kemp. We, of course, guarantee selling part of our catch every time, but the way prices are going at the auction, I think Mr. Kemp is going to come out the winner. Already he is in pocket and there is no indication that prices are going to dip this summer."

Thursday 27th May 1971.
In an effort to curb any potential crew trouble aboard their vessels, the company decided to install television sets in each of their ships. The 15 sets, including the special aerials they needed, would cost around ?200 each. Mr. Don Lister said of the decision:

"The ships can pick up English stations on the way up and way down. If they are fishing around Iceland they can receive programmes from the American base stations, and many programmes from the Norwegian television service are in English anyway. If a ship has to go into Iceland or Norway for some reason, there is very little for the crew to do, and that can lead to trouble on occasions. Having a TV on board will, I hope, occupy their minds and keep them out of trouble."

Thursday 10th June 1971.
The decision to make a private deal with the boilermakers during their work-to-rule actions caused quite a commotion on the fish docks. The deal was seen by others as something of a 'bowing down' but Consols justified their move by pointing out that no company can afford to have a third of its fleet tied up by a dispute ? which was exactly what may have happened if the dispute had carried on for much longer.

Thursday 13th February 1976.
Mr. Don Lister, speaking about quota restrictions, said that they (the company) would look at the situation carefully in the light of the quota given.

"It's no good fishing out your quota halfway through the year using larger vessels. We shall decide how many ships to use and send the others to the North Wall."

It would, he continued, definitely cause unemployment, as the ships had nowhere else to go.

Tuesday 11th May 1976.
Consolidated Fisheries announced that, until the Government did something to compensate the trawler crews, they would give their crews compensation for losses incurred by the Cod War. Mr. Nigel Marsden commented,

"So that the fight should continue, we as a company have decided that if the Government will not compensate the crews, then we will have to help them."

Thursday 14th September 1977.
Speaking about the plea to lift the ban on Icelandic vessels landing in Grimsby, the Managing Director of Consolidated Fisheries, Mr. Nigel Marsden said it was 'beyond belief' that Icelandic landings should be considered at a time when the port's trawlermen were out of work owing to the Icelandic attitude.

Friday 2nd December 1977.
The company announced economies and redundancies amounting to about 60% of the workforce. These economies would include the laying-up of seven of the eleven trawlers in the Consolidated fleet. The laying-up would result in the direct loss of 130 fishermen's jobs and the ripple effect of 50 shore workers being made redundant. The company blamed their forced situation on the exhausted Norwegian quotas and their displaced vessels making losses on the Westerly grounds

Monday 6th February 1978.
Consolidated Fisheries revealed that they were finalising negotiations to buy 10 seiners from Boston Deep Sea Fisheries in Hull. At this time, the company had a fleet of 11 trawlers of which only 5 were still in operation. Consolidated Fisheries, through its subsidiary Consolidated Seiners, already had eight seiners and were managing another four vessels.

Friday 3rd March 1978.
Consolidated bought the 10 seiners, which comprised the whole of Hull's seiner fleet, from Boston Deep Sea Fisheries.

Friday 12th May 1978.
Supplementing their fleet, Consolidated announced that they had bought two anchor-seiners, the Hanne Bork and the Ulla Viola.

Friday 16th June 1978.
In a deal finalised today, Consolidated Fisheries sold six of their laid up vessels to Colne Fishing, Lowestoft. The six vessels involved were Aldershot, Barnsley, Gillingham, Notts Forest, Port Vale, and the Huddersfield Town.

Monday 27th November 1978.
Consolidated Fisheries revealed the sale, to Colne Fishing, of their last three trawlers, the recently converted Real Madrid, Crystal Palace and the Carlisle.

Saturday 13th September 1980.
Vice-Chairman and Managing director Nigel Marsden took a ?5,000 a year pay cut. The decision was a result of a fishing climate that was 'not all that it should be'. He also announced major changes in the engineering and ship repair departments of the company and stressed that he would be looking closely at other departments to see where other economies could be made.

"When one is running a company, one has to get things to add up. I personally am taking a salary reduction of ?5,000. I don't believe in asking people to do things that I would not do myself," he said.

Friday 18th September 1981.
The news that Consolidated Fisheries were to sell part of its fleet of seiners and drastically reduce its operations shook the fish docks today. Their fleet of 20 vessels would be reduced to just 12 and the company premises was to move from their present site in Aukland Road to much smaller premises adjacent to the No1 Fish Dock. In doing so, its labour force would be cut from 25 to just eight. The move would also see their blacksmiths fitting shop, electricians department and painting shop all disappear. The end of its dramatic reconstruction would leave the company with just its fleet of 12 vessels and a fish merchanting business to operate.

"Over the past 18 months," Mr. Nigel Marsden explained, "we have sat back and looked at the job. We have waited to see if prices would improve or if costs would ease. But there comes a limit," he said.

Friday 26th November 1982.
Consolidated Fisheries announce closure. The reason was given as being due to a take-over bid by another company failing, shortage of cash, lack of government help, the failure of a take-over bid and the refusal of bankers to extend borrowing facilities. Sixty jobs were lost and the company still owned 16 seiners, three of those being laid up.

Thursday 30th December 1982.
Six weeks after the cessation of trading, Consolidated Fisheries announced the sale of their 16 vessels.




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



 
MARSDEN, Sir John Denton (I0586)
 
26 Discrepancies with names and dates of children. Comparing file.

That gives M M C Archer as 26 Dec 1849
A V Archer as 3 Sept 1854

and also a William Henry Archer born in 1856. However, this file has a John Charles Archer as 30 Sept 1856. 
ARCHER, William Henry (I0810)
 
27 DSA Architect Biography Report (April 17, 2008, 7:11 pm Google Search)



Basic Biographical Details
Name: Ernest Augustus Runtz
Designation: Architect
Born: 1859
Died: 15 October 1913

Bio Notes: Ernest Augustus Runtz was born in 1859, the sixth son of John J Runtz of Stoke Newington. A brother, Sir John Johnson Runtz, later joined their father's insurance broking firm as J J Runtz & Son, and was a member of the City Corporation from 1908 and first mayor of Stoke Newington in 1900. Ernest Augustus was articled to Samuel Walker, a London architect and chartered surveyor, from 1875 to 1880. Then three years later in 1883, he was taken into partnership. By 1889 Runtz had decided to extend the practice into architecture and began taking Professor Roger Smith's classes at University College when he won the Donaldson Silver Medal for Fine Art. He subsequently spent two years with Frederic Richard Farrow, then secretary of the Architectural Association, and while with Farrow, passed the qualifying exam, He was, however, refused admission as ARIBA because of his partnership with Walker which he dissolved on 1 January 1897 in an initially unsuccessful attempt to resolve the matter; he remained temporarily in the same office at 22 Moorgate Street after the dissolution of the partnership.
Runtz then recommenced practice as an architect in partnership with Albert Charles Breden, although it is unclear what the practice title was thereafter: there is evidence for it becoming Ernest Runtz & Co [Earl & Sell], whilst in 'Academy Architecture' it appears simply as 'Ernest Runtz'. Born about 1864, Breden had been articled to Benjamin Woollard about 1879-83, had studied at South Kensington and had spent a period as improver with Theophilus Allen in 1884. He was then successively assistant to Augustus Frere, Thomas Mullet Ellis, Edward Dru Drury & Alfred Lovejoy and the Veritys before joining Runtz. While an assistant he had passed the qualifying exam and was admitted ARIBA on 13 June 1892, his proposers being Frere, Drury and the London architect and surveyor Benjamin Tabberer.

Runtz was one of those selected to compete for the Strand-Aldwych improvements in 1900. Breden died on 12 January 1903, and Runtz then took George McLean Ford into partnership, the practice title becoming Ernest Runtz & Ford from that year. Born in 1867, Ford had been articled to Shiells & Thomson in Edinburgh 1884-89, and had spent about a year as assistant to James Bow Dunn before moving to London as assistant to John Birch. This enabled him to study at South Kensington and the Architectural Association and pass the qualifying exam in 1892. He was admitted ARIBA on 21 November 1892, his proposers being Leonard Aloysius Stokes, Arthur Cates and Edward Augustus Gruning.

Runtz had a very large commercial and theatre practice, mostly in a neo-Baroque style, influenced mainly by Belcher and Pite, but with continental nuances. His theatres were much admired by Edwin O Sachs in 'Modern Opera Houses and Theatres' but more recent opinion has been critical. The RIBA relented on the issue of his membership in June 1908 when he was admitted FRIBA, his proposers being John MacVicar Anderson, Aston Webb and Charles Henry Brodie.

Runtz was the most high-profile casualty of the Finance Act of 1909 which, as he himself observed, had made 'real property an unpopular and uncertain investment', but his financial problems had begun several years earlier. From 1897 until 1906 his earnings from his practice had averaged ?2,500 to ?3,000 per annum, but in 1907 the Law Guarantee & Accident Society failed, resulting in a loss of ?600 per annum in fees. In 1908 he had to resign from the board of the Birkbeck Bank, of which he had been a director since 1888, 'as a consequence of his losing an action brought by him as trustee against the other directors'. This resulted in his losing a further ?600 per annum and incurring legal costs. Runtz's practice had several significant commissions in 1908, but in the following year a second major client, the New London Discount Company, failed, apparently owing significant sums, and on 7 September Ford withdrew from the partnership which was to show a loss of ?406 for that year. Runtz took his son Ernest Munro Runtz into partnership as E Runtz & Son, and the practice returned to profit in 1911 when it made ?683. During these late years he and his son sometimes worked in association with Farrow's practice.

In 1912 Runtz had to have an operation, having been in poor health for at least a year. Although he had no other income, his wife's London East End properties having produced no rental since 1910, Runtz retired from the practice, probably with the object of insulating both it and his son from his rapidly mounting financial difficulties. A judgment against him for ?600 resulted in him becoming bankrupt on his own application on 3 April 1912, his debts amounting to ?8,387 15s 2d and his assets ?505 5s 3d.

In January 1913 Runtz's discharge from bankruptcy was suspended for the minimum period of two years. He did not live that long, dying on 15 October from the after-effects of the operation of the previous year.


Private and Business Addresses
The following private or business addresses are associated with this architect:
Address Type Date from Date to Notes
22, Moorgate Street, London EC, England Business 1897 *
10, Walbrook, London, England Business 1903
Victoria Street, Westminster, London, England Business 1909 1912

* earliest date known from documented sources.

Employment and Training
Employers
The following individuals or organisations employed or trained this architect (click on an item to view details):
Name Date from Date to Position Notes
Ernest Runtz & Co 1898 1903 or 1904 Partner
Ernest Runtz & Ford 1904 7 September 1909 Partner
Samuel Walker 1875 1880 Apprentice

Buildings and Designs
This architect was involved with the following buildings or structures from the date specified (click on an item to view details):
Date started Building name Town, district or village Island City or county Country Notes
1899 Hotel Metropole Glasgow Scotland
1900 Glasgow Central Stores Glasgow Scotland

References
Bibliographic References
The following books contain references to this architect:
Author(s) Date Part Title Publisher Notes
Architectural History Vol 13 (1970), p79 - list of theatres
Earl and Sell 2000 Guide to British Theatres, 1750-1950 London
Gray, A Stuart 1985 Edwardian Architecture: A Biographical Dictionary
Pike, W T London
Sachs, E O Modern Theatres and Opera Houses

Periodical References
The following periodicals contain references to this architect:
Periodical Name Date Edition Publisher Notes
Builder 24 October 1913
RIBA Journal 1 November 1913 London: Royal Institute of British Architects
The Times 7 September 1909 Notice of dissolution of Runtz & Ford partnership
The Times 25 April 1912 Notice of bankruptcy hearing
The Times 22 May 1912 Notice of bankruptcy hearing
The Times 29 January 1913 Notice of bankruptcy hearing
The Times 16 October 1913 Obituary


? 2006, Dictionary of Scottish Architects
Website and database design by Codex Geodata

Theatre Architect - refer http://www.theatre-architecture.eu/db.html?personId=2160

AND for fuller information this is the link which provides detailed biographical information




http://www.scottisharchitects.org.uk/architect_full.php?id=207819
 
RUNTZ, Ernest Augustus (I0037)
 
28 E-M from Terry Hockley 3.3.01.

Attached captioned that Will P. died 1923. However, was this Will P Senior?

Will Junior born 1885 ? 
GOVETT, William Harry (I0108)
 
29 Family Tree Website




http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/r/o/n/Joan-Ronald-East-Sussex/index.html 
GLASTONBURY, Gilbert Hall (I1034)
 
30 Hackney District - Metropolitan Board of Works

Representation increased to 2 members in 1885. George Offor (1855-1862)
John Joseph Tanner (1862-1868)
John Runtz (1868-1889)
Frederick Cox (1885-1888) Cox resigned December 1888.[35] Seat remained vacant until dissolution of MBW. Succeeded by London County Council.


PHOTO https://www.flickr.com/photos/sarflondondunc/177694379 
RUNTZ, John Johnson (I0071)
 
31 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nat_Jackley JACKLEY-HIRSCH, Nathaniel Tristram (I1104)
 
32 http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/thestar/obituary.aspx?pid=164704821
 
BROOKS, Leslie George (I0951)
 
33 http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/thestar/obituary.aspx?pid=169268700 ZWARICK, William Edward (I0966)
 
34 Information provided by Susi Nodding March 2002. E-mail: halebarn@primus.com.au  SIMMONS, Matilda (I0584)
 
35 Jimmy Runtz had been in New Zealand for most of his life working in Sheep Farming .

He moved to California as a retirement relocation , enabling him to be near his brother , Rev Anthony Runtz , a priest of the Josephite Congregation , working in Sant Maria . Jimmy was Parish handyman and helper .

The Congregation has a Parish and School there - much involved with the Hispanic Community .

It is worth mentioning that Fr Anthony Runtz was a brilliant self -taught carpenter .

Brian O'Gorman
18 Feb 2013
 
RUNTZ, James Munro (I0068)
 
36 John Farrell, born 1845, marries Mary Ann Stradwick -1866 and had MY GRANDFATHER B.1874, the same year as John Farrell, now called Gilbert Hastings Macdermott, is touring the States and making a
lot of money singing his famous song-

"We don't want to fight but by Jingo if we do, we've got the men, got the guns and got the money too".

Also sang "Champagne Charlie is my name"

By 1881 he is no longer with my g.grandmother, and is in digs in Brixton. Sometime in the early
1880's he sets up home with Annie Louise Milburn, and they have the following children-

Edward John b.1884,
James Patrick b.1887
Annie Louise b. 1889

at which time he had given up singing and acting and was a theatrical agent.

In the meantime my grandfather, also named John, married Alice Cloake in 1896.

Whilst he was fighting the Boer War Alice and the first of her children went
to live with Mac and family at Brixton -1901 Census.

My father Charles Farrell was the third child of John Junior and Alice, and dad married in 1933. Emily
Rust and I came along in 1934. Mac dies in Clapham Road in 1901, just after the
Census- the following day he had a big obituary in the Daily Telegraph.

I hope that is clear now. Annie Louise MacDermott marries Sydney Leon Wood at Brixton
in 1909, and Marie Lloyd was a witness.

 
FARRELL, John (I0677)
 
37 Nigel West (said by an Oxford don contact to be often unreliable) at Page 218 of his book A-Z of British Intelligence does say "A parallel SIS network run under commercial cover by Roland Gale from a shipping office"

This does accord with what the Author has learnt from the aforesaid Oxford don.

Thank you Nigel West 
GALE, Roland Philip (I0826)
 
38 No issue Family F043
 
39 Obituary published in Daily Telegraph 21 December 1993. Included within The Daily Telegraph 5th Book of Obituaries 1999.

"He was also fond of women."Yeah, I was married four times", he told one journalist in 1984, rolling his eyes. "Who needs 'em?" 
SMIRKE, Charles James William (I0141)
 
40 Originally married to Jeff Mills on 3 December 1960. Divorced 3 years later JACKLEY-HIRSCH, Josephine Davena (I0099)
 
41 Pall-bearer at the funeral of Dan Leno on 8 November 1904. Church of the Ascension on Balham Hill to South London Cemetery in Blackshaw Road. 3 miles, took 4 hours.

Dan Leno was born George Galvin Wilde in 1860. He died after suffering from a brain tumour on 31 October 1904.

Article in The Callboy (Journal of the BMHS) Spring 2004 relates that Tom McNaughton was a former King Water Rat.

Fellow pall-bearers, also former King Rats, were Joe O'Gorman (senior), Paul Martinetti, Eugene Stratton, Wal Pink and Joe Elvin.

Black Velvet at the Hippodrome Nov 1939


Quotation from Outbreak 1939 by Terry Charman - published by Virgin 2009

"The review Black Velvet, starring Churchill's son-in-law Vic Oliver, opened at the Hippodrome.

It too pleased Punch's critic: "It makes no notable contribution to the arts, but is very much what is wanted. Gay from the outset, it has a generous number of good turns and is constantly brightened by the personality of Vic Oliver." Appearing were ALICE LLOYD, "who gives an excellent imitation of her ever-to-be-lamented sister Marie Lloyd

The show received the royal seal of approval when the King and Queen and the Dukes and Duchesses of Gloucester and Kent made an informal visit on 27 November" 
NORTON, Thomas William (I0115)
 
42 RAF S/L - DSO, DFC & Bar
Gallantry Awards Won By Two Ontario Fliers

(By FOSTER BARCLAY.)
London, April 6 (CF). ? Three Canadians whose gallantry won recognition in the desert air war of the Middle East are listed in tonight's Air Ministry announcement of awards.
Acting Flight-Lieutenant John Ronald Urwin-Mann, born in Victoria, B.C., receives a bar to his Distinguished Flying Cross; Acting Flight-Lieutenant Robert Wilfred Alexander of Norwich, Ont., and Acting Flight-Lieutenant, Clifton Watt Harper of Brighton, Ont., receive the D.F.C.
Urwin-Mann was one of the R.A.F.'s top pilots in the spectacular battles over Britain in the fall of 1940 when the German air force tried unsuccessfully to defeat British air power. He was awarded the D.F.C. on Nov. 19, 1940, after his record showed he had shot down eight enemy planes. A member of Squadron 238, Urwin-Mann's second citation for a decoration does not establish whether he won it in raids on the Continent or over territory in the Middle East. The citation says:
"This officer led a formation of four aircraft in combat against a superior force of Messerschmitt 109's. Although he was wounded in the back, and later his aircraft was badly damaged, he flew it safely back to the base some sixty miles away. The next day, this officer was again leading his flight.
"He has been engaged in operational flying both in England and the Middle East and has led his flight squadron or wing on some forty sorties, often in adverse weather conditions."

_____________________________________________________

URWIN-MANN, F/O John Ronald (42281) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.238 Squadron
Awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 November 1940.

This officer has displayed initiative and dash in his many engagements against the enemy. He has led his section in an excellent manner and has destroyed at least eight enemy aircraft.

____________________________________________________

Born in Victoria, British Columbia, 29 July 1920;
educated at Brighton and mother living in
Sussex when he was decorated.
Joined RAF March 1939;
Pilot Officer as of 1 May 1939;
joined No.253 Squadron, 26 January 1940.
With No.238 Squadron, May 1940 to summer of 1942;
No.126 Squadron, summer 1942 to uncertain date.
In postwar RAF, retiring 17 April 1959.

___________________________________________________

Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. AFRO 649/42 dated 1 May 1942 (announcing Bar to DFC) does so as well. It would appear that even those publishing Air Force Routine Orders interpreted "Canadian" very broadly, as Chris Shores (Aces High, 2nd edition) is quite clear that Urwin-Mann was raised in England and had only a brief residence in Canada (rather like Max Aitkin). Air Ministry Bulletin 6590 refers to DFC award.

___________________________________________________

URWIN-MANN, F/L John Ronald (42281) - Bar to DFC - No.238 Squadron
Awarded as per London Gazette dated 7 April 1942. Air Ministry Bulletin 6598 refers.

In November 1941 this officer led a formation of aircraft in combat against a superior force of Messerschmitt 109s. Although he was wounded in the back and later his aircraft was badly damaged, Flight Lieutenant Urwin-Mann flew it safely back to base. Next day this officer was again leading his flight. He has been engaged on operational flying almost continuously since June 1940, both in England and the Middle East. He has led his flight, squadron or wing on some 40 sorties, often in adverse weather conditions. Many successes have been achieved in which Flight Lieutenant Urwin-Mann played a prominent part. He has destroyed at least eight enemy aircraft.

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/4782 has original recommendation as communicated by RAFHQ Middle East to Air Ministry, 24 February 1942. It differs in giving more details and is quoted below:

On 23 November 1941, Flight Lieutenant Urwin-Mann was leading a formation of four fighters which was engaged by a much superior force of Messerschmitt 109s. During the combat, Urwin-Mann he was wounded in the back and later had his aircraft badly damaged. Nevertheless, he managed to bring his aircraft over 60 miles across the desert to his base, and was leading his flight again the following day. This officer has been engaged on operations with his squadron almost continuously since June 1940, both in England and the Middle East, and has destroyed eight enemy aircraft, and probably destroyed or damaged four more. During the present campaign he has led his flight, squadron [and] wing on more than 40 operational sorties, sometimes in extremely bad weather and it is due to his unflagging keenness that formations led by him have successfully engaged and destroyed numerous enemy aircraft.

___________________________________________________

URWIN-MANN, S/L John Ronald (42281) - Distinguished Service Order - No.126 Squadron Awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 May 1943. Air Ministry Bulletin 10199 refers.

Within the past six months whilst operating from Malta, this officer has completed a large number of sorties, involving attacks on factories, warehouses, port installations, power stations and airfields in Sicily and nearby enemy islands. On one occasion he led a formation which attacked an airfield and destroyed many aircraft on the ground. Squadron-Leader Urwin-Mann also obtained a hit on a petrol installation, causing a violent explosion and a large fire. Another of his successes was the destruction of a portion of the main railway line during a sortie at Gela in January 1943. During the same operations Squadron Leader Urwin-Mann engaged a Messerschmitt 210, shooting away its starboard engine. By his great skill and inspiring leadership this officer has raised his squadron to a high pitch of fighting efficiency. 
URWIN-MANN, John Ronald (I0607)
 
43 Refer full entry Ernest Walter Gurl GURL (I0976)
 
44 Reported at length in The Era of 29 April 1899. Extensive list of guests and wedding presents. Family F004
 
45 Sister of Elizabeth Dorcas Pericho, wife of Ernest C.Munro. Brothers married sisters PERICHO, Lilian Monica (I0429)
 
46 Sister of Lilian Monica Pericho, wife of John Cyril Munro Runtz. Brothers married sisters. PERICHO, Elizabeth Dorcas (I0417)
 
47 Source of all information on Nightingall family - Linda in June 2003.

Advised that Arthur was a Grand National Winner. 
NIGHTINGALL, Arthur (I0788)
 
48 The Silver Salver of Sydney Westwood Runtz

Relationships

Sydney Westwood Runtz was born in 1875, the younger son of Sir John Johnson and Emma Runtz nee Westwood. His sister, Florence Emma, born 1865, was my grandmother. Sir John and Emma Runtz had one other son, John Stanley, born in 1870 and although he got married, I am not aware of his having any children. Sydney never married so far as I know.

My grandmother, Florence Emma, married William Gamble in 1888 and had a son Arthur William, who sadly died very suddenly when he was only 18, and a daughter Florence Margaret who was my mother.

Sir John?s wife Emma was the middle daughter of William and Ann Elizabeth Westwood who had three daughters; Mary Ann, born 1839, Emma, born 1843, and Jeanette, born 1845.

Mary Ann married Edward Daniel Greatbach in 1867. They had a daughter Elsie in 1872 who married Albert James Sharwood. Albert James and Elsie Sharwood had three children; two boys, Cyril and Robert ("Bob"), and one girl, Joan, who sadly died in childbirth.

Florence Emma Runtz and Elsie Greatbach were therefore first cousins and my mother, and Cyril and Bob Sharwood, were second cousins. Unlike so many cousins, they kept in touch and were friends.

The First World War

My understanding is that during the First World War the coal mines were privately owned. Relations between the mine owners and the miners were pretty tough and rough, and the Government was concerned that coal supplies might be put at risk if there were to be a strike. The Government did not nationalise the mines, but appointed a Controller of Mines to make sure that supplies were not put in jeopardy. Exactly how this worked I do not know. Sydney Runtz worked as a Financial Adviser in the Finance Department of the Controller. Quite what he did I do not know but I remember that one day when I was in the National Archives, some years ago, I was waiting for something and happened to pull out some minutes of some department and found Sydney chairing meetings of what was clearly some important committee. When he left the department his colleagues presented him with this magnificent salver.

The Second World War

In the early part of 1940 things looked pretty black in this country. The Germans were on just the other side of the channel and it seemed that there was nothing to stop them invading this country. The Commonwealth countries (or the Dominions as they were then often known) and the USA were offering parents in this country to look after their children until the war was over. Bob Sharwood had married Joan Robertson and had been sent by his company (I think it might have been Shell or ICI) to Canada, and Bob and Joan were willing to take my brother, sister and myself and look after us. There was a boat in Liverpool available to take us and my parents decided to send us over to Canada with our nanny. Our mother could have joined us, but not my father. My mother decided to stay with our father.#

Exchange control prevented people taking money out of the country which was almost bankrupt at that time. So, in order to take something, my father bought some diamonds which were secreted in the heels of our shoes! We also took with us some family silver including the silver salver which had been presented to Sydney Runtz in 1919 by his colleagues in the Department of Mines. As neither Sydney nor his brother Stanley had any children, the salver passed down his sister?s family to the only descendent of Sir John, namely my mother.

My sister remembers seeing some of our family silver for sale in the shop window of a jeweller in Montreal but the salver was never sold. Clearly, after the war Bob and Joan held on to the silver which had not been sold and kept it for their own use.

More recently

And so the story would have ended, except that the salver passed down to their son Gordon and he is a very generous chap. I had kept in touch with both Gordon and his sister Sally, and I was told by Gordon that he had this salver on his sideboard on which he kept his whisky decanter. He knew that I was a descendent of the Runtz family and he felt that I should have it back. I offered to buy it from him, but he would have none of it, he wanted to give it to me as a gift if I would buy him dinner next time he was in London, which I did. Sally brought it across on one of her trips and some time later I was able to buy Gordon his dinner.



William Grant
11 February 2008











 
RUNTZ, Sidney Westwood (I0197)
 
49 Uncertain whether the line of children from Jacob are by Jane Barnard or "Rebecca".

Correspondence with Margot Bailey from Melbourne Australia in November 2007 
REBECCA (I1035)
 
50 [Gurl.ftw]

 
PROCTER, Nora Nina (I0528)
 


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